Coochiemudlo Community

From the most delightful carpark at the Victoria Point harbour, one descends the many stairs to the jetty. After a 10 minute trip across to the island, there is both sand beaches and mangroves skirting the island to explore. From flying fox colony in the centre of the island to the native bee hive on the road side, the island community identity is unique.

Gheebulum

Dr Robert V Anderson OAM, Uncle Bob is a Ngugi (Moreton Island) elder and patriarch of Quandamooka. This 2010 portrait image of Uncle Bob – Gheebulum (traditional name for the Moreton Island sand hill dune) connected Uncle Bob and Jo Kaspari intimately.

Pre-dating the native title determinations on Minjerriba, it speaks something of the 18 year struggle to have the traditional home lands of Quandamooka returned to Aboriginal peoples.

Dawn over Home Beach, Point Lookout

“The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ,
Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.”
― Omar Khayyám

“Wake! For the Sun, who scatter’d into flight
The Stars before him from the Field of Night,
Drives Night along with them from Heav’n,
and strikes
The Sultan’s Turret with a Shaft of Light”

― Omar Khayyám,

Following from a conversation with Uncle Bob this morning…

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Quandamooka Patriarch

Uncle Bob Anderson is pictured here with Cathy Boyle, Cameron Costello (CEO of QYAC) and Jo Kaspari as we discuss issues dear to the Quandamooka patriarch’s heart such as the continued extraction of fresh water from Minjerriba’s aquifer, the Toondah Harbour redevelopment, and indigenous business enterprise.

Blackesley’s Anchorage

Blackesley’s Anchorage is a one kilometre stretch of beach on the south west side of Minjerriba. On mining lease, it is a site of unregulated camping and sadly this idyllic location is frequented by campers who bury their rubbish rather than take it with them!

Checker Board Island

1970’s Russell Island was mapped out like a checker board of residential size blocks. Cheap land was sold by flyovers, which tidal waters subsumed. Mangrove enclaves were sold as exclusive property on waters edge. To this day property remains rock bottom.